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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,149 (some duplicates have been removed)
of this push, these strict voter i.d. laws, this is being pushed almost exclusively by republicans, yes or no? >> there are issues where democrats and republicans are at fault, where they are both to blame. this is not one of these issues. this is an issue that since the 2010 elections, laws that restrict the right to vote have been passed overwhelmingly by republicans in states with republican legislatures and republican government. that includes efforts to crack down on voter registration drives, to make it harder for people to register by demanding proof of citizenship. that means cutting back on early voting. that requires the government- issued i.d. to cast a ballot. that prevents ex-felons from voting after they served their time. purging the voter rolls. these are all laws that have been passed by republicans and republican states. that is why the article was titled the gop war on voting. tavis: why are the republicans pushing this issue? what is the take away for them? >> if you ask republicans why they are pushing the issue, they will give you a two word response. voter fraud. if you
. particularly in swing states controlled by republican legislatures like pennsylvania's voter i.d. law. what is the purpose of that law again pennsylvania's republican house majority leader? >> voter i.d. which is going to allow governor romney to win the state of pennsylvania. done. >> jon: but hey -- (laughter). -- this is just between us chickens, right? huh? i mean, when the mics and the cameras go on pick a lock, you know what i'm talking about? pick a lock. what's that red -- okay, so it's on. as it turns out, the voter i.d. laws ostensibly set up to stop nonexistent inn-person voter fraud have the residual effect of disenfranchising and suppressing actual eligible voters. disproportionately of the minority, poor, and elderly variety or, as they are sometimes known, democrats. (laughter) of course, that law has been challenged in the courts and we are expecting a ruling -- (laughter). all right, just roll the ruling. >> we have breaking news right now. a judge has issued a decision in pennsylvania's controversial voter i.d. law. >> jon: all those without voter i.d. must gay marry whils
as a law student at harvard. video at a press conference where obama says nothing news worthy. that was explosive tape, not at all. last month it was the drudge report, which means the romney c campaign, it was them again dousing themselves in gasoline and pulling the fire alarm as what was hyped as outrageous video of president obama saying he believes in redistribution. specifically it was that he believes essentially in the progressive tax code that we have had in this country for a time period that's more easily measured in centuries than in individual years. again, not exactly a bomb shell. now they are dousing themselves in gasoline and hitting the fire alarm all over again over a video of president obama speaking as a candidate in 2007. in this video, which the right is very excited about tonight but which has been available online since 2007, mr. obama, then a candidate, acknowledges the presence in the room of his former pastor from chicago, reverend jeremiah wright. steve smith was part of the strategic team in 2008 when they decided that they would not attack barack
changing the law in order to do that? but what's the next best thing? maybe you can't win legally, but maybe you can get the word out. if you can be confusing enough about it, maybe you can forget the law. by virtue of intimidation or at least confusion. here's how it works in the great state of mississippi. in the great state of mississippi this past november, a referendum passed saying people couldn't vote without documentation. that many thousands of mississippi residents do not have. yesterday the department of justice told mississippi that given the special scrutiny that state earned under the voting rights act for many years of suppressing the black vote, given that special scrutiny, the justice department said no to this new proposed law in mississippi. or at least they said not yet. this law is at least not going election in mississippi. you're not going to have to show i.d. to vote in mississippi. the worry here was that because thousands of mississippi legal voters don't have the i.d. that would have been necessary under the new law, this new law would have kept dispropo
will look at other hot topics affirmative action, same sex marriage, and voting rights. then, a new law in virginia may force many of the state's abortion clinics to shut down. and we will look and have local residents and virginia are organizing against a push by the nuclear and -- industry to lift the state's 3-year-long ban on uranium mining. >> we have spent 30 years on the fantasy of containment. there is no way to contain toxic or nuclear waste. he can come back to your drawing boards and come up with recommendations. but guess what? the community here and all the people down there river, all the way to north carolina and virginia beach are going to stop this. >> all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are on the road in the capital of virginia, richmond. the official u.s. military death toll in afghanistan has passed the 2000 mark. more than 11 years into the war. in the latest attack, the suicide bomber killed 14 people, including three soldiers in the all the people down thereeastern khost r today. on
made a decision to actually reverse a decision he made before on that state's voter i.d. law. it was one of the strictest laws in the country and everyone wanted to know if it was going to go into effect before this election. republican supporters say this kind of law would stop voter fraud. democrats said not really that it would really just keep a lot of voters from being able to vote. real, legitimate citizens who maybe just don't happen to have an i.d., driver's license, or passport. joining me now is cnn crime and justice correspondent joe johns. so, joe, let's break this down. since this is breaking news and you know how it can go with legal decisions, they can be looked at a whole lot of different ways. this particular case, this judge had to look at not the constitutionality of voter i.d.s, he had to look at specifically whether the people of pennsylvania all had equal access to get i.d.s and get to the polls in time. and he's reversed himself from his earlier decision. where does this leave us? >> well, big picture. okay, ashleigh, it's a victory for opponents of the
on these changes to the law before they were introduced in state houses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and -- >>> we had a drum roll of media attention that said if you don't stop and watch the debates that night you're really missing out on an important cultural moment. >> announcer, funding is provided by, carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman
. ♪ >> debates are better. >> eliot: that was more fun to watch. the voter i.d. law lord, you got no reason ♪ ♪ you got no right ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ i find myself at the wrong place ♪ [ male announcer ] the ram 1500 express. ♪ ♪ it says a lot about you. ♪ ♪ in a deep, hemi-rumble sort of way. guts. glory. ram. >> eliot: it was supposed to be the thing that would help mitt romney win the state of pennsylvania. don't take my word for it. here's pennsylvania state house republican leader mike turzai in june. >> voter i.d. which will allow governor romney to win the state of pennsylvania, done. >> eliot: actually, not quite done. on tuesday a pennsylvania judge ruled that state officials cannot enforce this controversial new law in next month's presidential election. the reason as judge robert simpson who had upheld the law in august before the state supreme court directed him to reconsider now writes and i quote... only a judge could write that. in other words the difficulty of obtaining the i.d. cards needing t
of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
law school in three parts of yale law school on the supreme court for corporately no other law schools in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and this was, you know, supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same. but just as on the other side of first street, the united states congress is deeply divided, according to party, so was the united states supreme court. and this is a moment of real partisan division at the supreme court. and that is exemplified in case
by the federal government, and they are challenging the law that allows this because they are concerned their communications will be picked up. up, and in the course of that surveillance, they have the right to challenge that in court. that is the standing issue. to get to the merits, fisa passed in 1978, and in the aftermath about abuses, it set up a system by which the executive branch would have to go to the court in d.c. and get permission when they wanted to do wiretapping for national security purposes. this is a way of making sure the court -- it had a check and a role in reviewing the efforts to do this wiretapping, which had designed in 1978 is congressthe problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications -- surveillance required court approval. the statute referred to the technology at the time, those communications that were wired, radioed, or satellite technology. since 1978 we have seen a dramatic change of the technology of communications, particularly fiber optic cable, which has changed the court they try to get this case in electronic surveillance. the r
to bash banks and that is as phony as a $3 bill. also a judge strikes down pennsylvania's voter id law and the obama administration is telling companies it is okay to disregard the law when it comes to handing out pink slips in advance to big budget cuts. all three happening before the election. mitt romney has finally put meat on the bones of his tax reform idea. he floated the idea of a $17,000 cap on tax reform reduction. >> you could say everyone is going to get up to a $17,000 deduction. you can fill that bucket if you will and higher income people might have a lower number. >> this is brand new stuff. we have howard dean former vermont governor and candidate. and let's look at this for a second. what do you think? a $17,000 cap on tax deductions for everybody as a way of being fair because the upper end would pay more. what do you think? >> i don't have a problem with the eidea of deductions. here you are. you guys are talking about the private sector all the time. so, i've been convinced because of the high rate of canadian home ownership, i'm not convinced of doing away with ch
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
of the supreme court, certainly intellect, experience, obs vance of the rule of law and precedent. but the supreme court is the final word of what is the law of the land and so therefore i don't want to see more who say that discrimination against women and discrimination based on gender is not protected against under the constitution. when i go by the supreme court on my way to work every day over the mantle it says equal justice under law. it does not say equal justice for some people in america and not for others. and as it relates to row v. wade, i support that. i support a woman's right to choose. my opponent i don't know which view he has. last year he was prolife, now he's pro-choice. >> senator business and industry complain that the 2010 fair act will be expensive and cut into profits and slow the economic recovery. how do you respond to critics who argue that the economic burden of implementing this policy will wind up costing even more american jobs? >> first of all, the reality is what did he have before the law, double premium increases, unsustainable for a family who
right have been denied by an oppressive law that says in order for churches to qualify for tax-exempt status they are absolutely printd from directly or indirectly participating in or intervening in any political campaign on behalf of or in opposition to any candidate for elective public office. folks, this law is just another example of obama's war on religion. which he cleverly passed in 1954. (laughter) but now some brave religious leaders have banded together to fight for their right to partyfy fill united nations. >> stephen: some one thousand pastors nationwide are preparing to deliver a sermon the i.r.s. may not want to hear. they're trying to draw attention to a 1954 tax code that prohibits tax-exempt organizations like churches from engaging in political endorsements a group known as the i ay lines defending freedom is now challenging the code claiming it violates preacher's right for free speech. >> they've marched october 7 as pulpit freedom sunday. >> yes, pulpit freedom sunday. when the thrill of lengthy sermons finally meets the excitement of tax policy. pulpit fr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,149 (some duplicates have been removed)